Example uses of KinTek Explorer

The KinTek Explorer can be used to fit any kinetic or equilibrium data based on any signal that can be detected, be it optical, chemical, electrical or radioactive. Below is a limited set of examples. The possible uses of KinTek Explorer endless.

  1. Enzyme Mechanisms
  2. Chemical Reaction Kinetics 
  3. Receptor Binding Kinetics 
  4. Ribozyme Kinetics
  5. Protein Folding 
  6. Organic Reaction Mechanisms 
  7. Chemical engineering: Bio-Reactor Design
  8. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics

This figure shows the simultaneous fitting of four stopped-flow experiments to define the kinetic constants for the reaction of serine with pyridoxal phosphate at the active site of tryptophan synthase. You can see these data in the example file tryptophan_synthase.mec, which can be opened from the examples folder using the student version of the software. 


Features of the KinTek Explorer

  • Simple, Intuitive User Interface: Enter new models in simple E + A = EA = EI = EP = E + P format, with instant feedback to highlight errors while you type.
  • Dynamic Simulation: Scroll rate constants, starting concentrations and output factors while viewing changes in the shape of the graph.
  • Robust Data Fitting Routines: Perform nonlinear regression based upon the simulation of the exact model, not mathematical approximations to reality.
  • Global Fitting of Multiple Experiments: Simultaneously fit multiple experiments performed under different starting conditions.
  • Exploration using Linked or Fixed Rate Constants: Fix individual constants or link two or more rate constants to vary in unison while dynamically scrolling and fitting data.
This figure illustrates the dynamic simulation nature of the KinTek Explorer. The user can scroll the value of a particular rate constant by dragging it up or down with the mouse. Instantly, the program re-calculates and displays the resulting curves in real time.

This figure illustrates the dynamic simulation nature of the KinTek Explorer. The user can scroll the value of a particular rate constant by dragging it up or down with the mouse. Instantly, the program re-calculates and displays the resulting curves in real time.

The figure shows an example of a good global fit obtained for experiments with widely varying signals intensities. Experiment 1 rapid chemical quench-flow data. Experiment 2 represents stopped-flow fluorescence data. The two experiments are fit simultaneously so that the data shows the correlation between chemistry and fluorescence signals. These data are provided in the example file HIVRT_fluor_qf.mec, from a paper by Kellinger and Johnson.

The figure shows an example of a good global fit obtained for experiments with widely varying signals intensities. Experiment 1 rapid chemical quench-flow data. Experiment 2 represents stopped-flow fluorescence data. The two experiments are fit simultaneously so that the data shows the correlation between chemistry and fluorescence signals. These data are provided in the example file HIVRT_fluor_qf.mec, from a paper by Kellinger and Johnson.